Skip to content

Biographies

Town of Canton >> Visitors >> Sight-Seeing >> Your Silent Neighbors >> Biographies

Key Points regarding Revaluation Phase In Information - CLICK HERE 

 

Click here for the 2024 Town Budget Meeting Schedule

FEMA Flood Map Changes/Appeal Process (2/28/24-5/28/24)


INSTRUCTIONS: Change the folder ID below to match the sub-folder you wish to use as sub-pages/sub-navigation. DO NOT USE THIS WITH THE "Generic Single-Column" TEMPLATE.



Your Silent Neighbors

Take a tour through the past with “Your Silent Neighbors", which introduces readers to people out of Canton’s past.

“Your Silent Neighbors” introduces readers to people out of Canton’s past.  Readers are encouraged to visit these gravesites and pay their respects to the people who have helped make our community what it is today.

Choose a name from the list to begin your journey into Canton's past:


5/8/2022 - Charles Blair

On a blustery March day in 1857, Charles Blair, then head of the Collins Company forge shop, stepped into a local store on Main Street in Collinsville and was suddenly and unexpectedly caught up in the most divisive moment of American history—the Civil War. In George Polk’s drug store Blair met militant abolitionist John Brown who had spoken in town the night before. The encounter would lead to the Collins Company making pikes for Brown that, to everyone’s surprise, he would later use in a raid on the federal arsenal in Harpers Ferry,Virginia, an attempt to start a slave revolt. In 1859, Brown would hang for his efforts. Blair would be subpoenaed by Congress not long afterward. Suspicious senators harshly questioned his relationship with Brown and his intentions in producing arms to aid in an insurrection against the government of the United States.

Amherst, Massachusetts born in 1812, Charles Blair came to work at the Collins Company in 1832 as a “helper.” He retired from Collins in 1876, having long been superintendent of the works. An ardent supporter of Lincoln, he worked hard to produce material for the Union war effort, including swords and bayonets. A civic-minded individual, he held various offices, including state representative. The Hartford Courant called him “a man thoroughly trusted by all who know him” and “a public spirited man and useful citizen.” Nevertheless, despite long service with the Collins Company and many good works, Charles Blair went to his grave knowing he would be best remembered for his dealings with John Brown, a chapter in his life he thought best forgotten.

His wife of over 50 years, Eunice Blodgett Blair, died in 1890. Afterward, Charles Blair was inconsolably distraught and suffered a steady and irreversible decline in his strength. He died at his home, 6 The Green, on March 18, 1893 at age 81 and was buried in the Village Cemetery, Collinsville.

“Your Silent Neighbors” introduces readers to people out of Canton’s past. Readers are encouraged to visit these gravesites and pay their respects to the people who have helped make our community what it is today.




INSTRUCTIONS: Change the content ID below to match the "Contact Us" page you wish to reference in the "sidebar".

INSTRUCTIONS: Right-click the image below to remove it or choose "Properties...". Then click the photo icon for "Choose Image" to change the photo. You do not have to change the picture width to a percent in this right-column. DO NOT USE THIS WITH THE "Generic Single-Column" TEMPLATE.

Contact Us


Kathleen Taylor
Town Historian

Carolyn Woodard
Deputy Town Historian

Christopher Hager
Deputy Town Historian

 

Office: (860) 693-5800
Fax: (860) 693-5804
Email
Location: 40 Dyer Ave, Canton, CT 06019